What I’ve been reading: Flanagan/Larsen

Read what I thought of them here: Librarium 2015


International Women’s Day : Laura Bates

“Again and again, people told me sexism is no longer a problem – that women are equal now, more or less, and if you can’t take a joke or take a compliment, then you need to stop being so ‘frigid’ and get a sense of humor. Even if I couldn’t solve the problem right away, I was determined that nobody should be able to tell us we couldn’t talk about it anymore.”

In 2012, Laura Bates set up The Everyday Sexism Project website, giving a voice to women and girls, a place where they could share their stories and experiences of being female in a male-dominated world. Frankly, anyone who can read those contributions without being appalled and embarassed about the inequalities between the genders, is burying their head in the sand. From all walks of life, all situations, day in day out, the stories poured in; stories of a constant drip, drip of comments, gestures, attacks and worse which all served to put women and girls in their place, ie on a strata below men. Our girls are growing up in a society where they are nominally equal, but obviously less than equal. In 2014 Laura Bates collected thousands of the stories that had been shared via the website and published them in a book called Everyday Sexism and which I reviewed on my Librarium 2014 page. I think it’s essential reading for everyone.


Start spreading the news..

Bridget:

My daughter has just returned from a short stay in New York – what an opportunity. Here are some of her pictures.

Originally posted on PJV:

Last week a group of over 70 Photojournalism, Photography and Graphic Design students from Staffordshire University visited New York, and I was lucky enough to be a part of that group! The trip was an amazing experience, and I was able to visit not only some must-see tourist attractions, but see some amazing works of art in the flesh at the Museum of Modern Art! As well as some incredible photography, I also walked round exhibitions from the likes of Jackson Pollock and Andy Warhol. MoMA is definitely not one to miss if you’re ever in New York. I also visited The Rockefeller Centre and experienced breathtaking views of Manhattan during sunset from the Top of The Rock, went shopping on 5th Ave., took the free ferry to Staten Island after dark to see the Manhattan skyline and Lady Liberty lit up, and visited the 9/11 memorial centre. With too many…

View original 48 more words


What I’ve been reading: Ackroyd/Catton

Read what I thought of them here: Librarium 2015


Friday Haikube – for Olaf

haikube for Olaf


NordicNoiromance: 10 reasons to love The Bridge

BronBroen (ounodesign.com)Over the past week I have binge-watched the original Scandinavian TV series The Bridge, series 1 (2011) and series 2 (2013). It was created and  written by Hans Rosenfeldt and starred Sofia Helin and Kim Bodnia as (respectively) Swedish and Danish investigating cops based on either side of the Oresund Bridge which links the two countries. I think it’s probably the best thing I’ve ever watched on TV, and here are 10 reasons why:-

  1. The Photography is stunning. Set in the cities of Copenhagen and Malmo, there is a wealth of high impact scenery here. Virtually every link between scenes shows a breathtaking shot of one of these cities; the bad bits as well as the good. There are also a lot of water shots, the bridge being a central character in the show.
  2. Saga Noren is the investigating detective from Malmo. A woman in her early thirties, Saga knows how to kick arse (that’s the Brit spelling) and looks as though she eats three times a day, which is a refreshing change. Although it’s not spelt out, Saga is on the autism spectrum and does not always respond predictably in social situations. Also in her favour ….she wears leather jeans and drives a Porsche 911.
  3. Women are fully represented in this series. As well as Saga, at least half the Swedish team are women, the Danish chief of police is a woman, a newspaper editor is a woman…..women are everywhere taking part in society and being treated as intelligent human beings with ideas and opinions which are listened to.
  4. The language is a joy to listen to. The show is subtitled in English, the dialogue being a mixture of both Danish and Swedish. I loved how some phrases could easily have been uttered by someone in the North East of England or Scotland.
  5. The Scandinavians know how to keep warm. Everyone seems to have a proper woollen coat down to their knees, and plenty of layers of warm knits, quilted bodywarmers and thermal underwear. How very sensible.
  6. Turningtorso2011The architecture is really cool. One building that caught my eye is, upon further research, The Turning Torso in Malmo; Scandinavia’s tallest building, designed by the architect Santiago Calatrava. It looks as though it shouldn’t really be possible. The Bridge itself is also rather beautiful, and there are many, many shots of it throughout the two series, taken from every imaginable angle.
  7. The Theme Tune, played with the opening and closing credits, is a haunting song called Hollow Talk by Copenhagen band Choir of Young Believers. I thought it was rather dreary at first, but by the end of series 2 I was hooked. It just fits so well.
  8. Martin Rohde, the detective on the Danish team, is a tortured soul, emotionally fragile, but can be a roaring tiger when needs must. A huge bear of a man, with the most expressive face, he looks like the ideal cuddle dispenser. Unfortunately for Martin, the misfortune keeps on escalating, and I fear we have seen the last of him.
  9. The storylines are pretty far out and crazy, but somehow the brilliance of the writing, the performance and all my previous points make it immaterial. Nothing can belittle the impact of all-round fabulousness.
  10. Series 3 is in production and will be on our screens at the end of this year or in early 2016 (earlier if you live in Scandinavia of course). I can hardly wait.Bridge (insider-language.de)

My Top Reads 2012-14

The Sea review    Bring Up The Bodies review   A Girl is a Half-formed Thing review


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